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This Is Why 2016 Is Going To Last A Second Longer Than Most Other Years

Written by Ana Krneta
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For example, when the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake occurred which caused the devastating tsunami on boxing day of that year, the shift in the Earth’s crust caused the Earth to lose 2.68 seconds off its rotation.

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The reason for all this is because the way we mark the passage of time, and what we base our calendar on is the Earth’s rotation. So scientists add an extra second, or even day, when needed to keep our calendars and clocks in line with the rotation. It keeps our clocks accurate!

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Leap seconds only started being added as of 1972, when scientists learned that the Earth’s orbit was not always exact. Since then, there have been 26 leap seconds added around the globe. Even though most of us can’t wait for 2016 to be over, an extra second is not so bad.

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Leap seconds only started being added as of 1972, when scientists learned that the Earth’s orbit was not always exact. Since then, there have been 26 leap seconds added around the globe. Even though most of us can’t wait for 2016 to be over, an extra second is not so bad.

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